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Month: March 2022

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  • Review: The Pirates of Penzance

Review: The Pirates of Penzance

The Pirates of Penzance by The Edinburgh Gilbert and Sullivan Society is fascinating. It begins with a long musical introduction characteristic of opera. Light and dainty music accompany a silhouetted…

An attack on social mobility: the English government’s plans to restrict access to student loans

The Department for Education (DfE) recently set out potential plans to restrict access to government student loans in England for students who lack English and Maths GCSEs, or two A-levels…

The case against a Ukrainian ‘no-fly zone’

If you want peace, do not prepare for nuclear war Enforcing a no-fly zone over the skies of Ukraine would be the singularly most idiotic action that NATO could undertake…

Britain’s reliance on Russian money

In what will come as a surprise to nobody except our bumbling prime minister, Johnson’s government has, yet again, surrounded itself in controversy. This week, it’s the cushy relationship our…

Review: Happening

Glasgow Film Festival Exclusive Amid a recent slew of women-directed abortion dramas including the likes of Never Rarely Sometimes Always, Unpregnant, and Portrait of a Lady on Fire, Happening, Audrey…

Review: The Batman

Ever since Christopher Nolan broke the bank with 2008’s The Dark Knight, the onscreen Batman story has struggled. Nolan’s sweeping, post-9/11 crime drama redefined what superhero cinema could be, and…

Racism at the Ukrainian Border: A reminder that racism doesn’t pause in times of war

Picture this: your country has been invaded because the leader of the neighbouring country feels threatened by democracy. So, you decide to flee your home, the town you grew up…

Review: Billions

Highlighting grey areas in morality can be a struggle for a show – let alone doing it successfully. However, Showtime’s Billions joins the slew of its series that excel in…