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This Week in History: 20 March 2003 The Iraq war begins

On the evening of 18 March 2003, Tony Blair won support to join UK troops in the American invasion of Iraq. Despite the motion being passed by 412 votes to 149 in the House of Commons, the decision sparked a major backbench rebellion for the Labour party. Britain’s overall involvement in the Iraq War has […]

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Features

This Week in History: First attempted assassination of Tsar Alexander II of Russia

On 4 April 1866, Alexander II became the target of the first assassination attempt on a Russian Tsar. The Emperor had dedicated his reign to a string of domestic reforms in response to the outcome of the Crimean War in 1856, where it became evident that Russia was unable to compete with other European powers. […]

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Film Reviews

La La Land

Damien Chazelle’s La La Land has attracted a mass of attention since its release in the UK on 13th January. There was praise for the whole project at the Golden Globes, where the film won no less than seven awards, including Best Motion Picture and Best Original Song. This feel-good and nostalgic musical is being […]

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This week in history: the birth of Bruce Springsteen

Turning 67 on 23rd September, Bruce Springsteen is about to release his autobiography, tipped to earn perhaps the highest ever pay-out for a music memoir. The lead up to Born to Run has seen the musician open up about his struggle with depression and pay tribute to his working-class, New Jersey roots. Famous for their […]

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Features

This Week in History: the unlikely demise of Isadora Duncan

This week 89 years ago, bohemian dancer and advocate of free love Isadora Duncan was killed in an unlikely turn of events. Described by Jack Anderson in 2008 as ‘the woman who put the Modern into Modern Dance’, Duncan is viewed through her dancing as a pioneer for female expression. Her bohemian flair and progressive […]

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Features

This week in history: the introduction of ‘OK’ into national vernacular

On 23 March, 1839, the term ‘OK’ was published in the Boston Morning Press. We may not usually think about the words we use in everyday conversation, but before ‘OK’ was added into the standard vernacular, what did we use instead? As Allan Metcalf points out in the February 2011 BBC News Magazine: ‘’OK’ is […]

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News

Scotland’s statues reflect lack of gender diversity

Overwhelming under-representation of women in Edinburgh’s statues has led to criticism, after it was found that there were more statues of animals than women in the capital. While there are four statues of animals dispersed throughout the city, there are only three of women, two of which depict Queen Victoria. In response to this burgeoning […]