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edfringe 2019

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The Last of the Pelican Daughters review

‘Confusing yet predictable’ is the perfect way to describe Wardrobe Ensemble’s latest play, The Last of the Pelican Daughters. At the end of the show, everyone in the audience has…

‘Seamless and succinct’: Tokyo Rose review

Tokyo Rose is a seamless, succinct sum-up of Asian-American identity and anti-East Asian racism in the West. It gives off Hamilton vibes, telling the story of an American figure through…

‘Bittersweet’: Pink House review

On the surface, Pink House is a simple tale of Shira’s family, home and life. But underlying it is complex themes of Jewishness, family, trauma, and loss, spun deftly through…

In conversation with Tim Marriott, writer of Mengele

Trigger warning: Holocaust In Mengele, a show that ran at the Fringe in 2019 for its second year, Tim Marriott plays Mengele, an SS officer and physician in Auschwitz who…

Nish Kumar: It’s in Your Nature to Destroy Yourselves review

It’s in Your Nature to Destroy Yourselves is a well-put together and strikingly political comedy set which has the audience captivated and laughing throughout. Nish Kumar confronts racism with his…

From India to Triana review

A perfect blend of Indian and flamenco, From India to Triana is an exploration of dance and music styles from the different cultures. Produced and staged by home-grown company, The…

‘One of the greatest adaptations’: Dalloway review

On stage, Mrs Dalloway says she will buy the flowers herself and so the play begins. There is only one woman on stage, and she gives voice to every character…

Limb(e)s review

The circus is given a dark, mournful twist in Limb(e)s, created by and starring Gabrielle Martin and Jeremiah Hughes. Their experimental show combines spell-binding movements with artistic lighting and an…