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Literature

‘In Other Words’: Tills’ summertime pop-up bookshop

Tucked away at the edge of the Meadows, directly across the road from Tills bookshop, hides a delightful little green police box. This police box is anything but ordinary because it now houses a delightful pop-up shop, ‘In Other Words,’ associated with Tills bookshop. The pop-up shop offers a variety of translated works with themes […]

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Lifestyle

Finding your favourite falafel: a comprehensive guide

A hummus falafel wrap is almost as synonymous with Edinburgh students as mullets and flared jeans. Maybe you’ve just begun dipping your toe into the wonderful world of chickpea goodness or maybe you’re a seasoned expert who can distinguish between The African Wrap and the Nile Valley equivalent. Either way, I’m certain you will appreciate […]

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Culture Literature

Poetry in Motion: The Legacy of Robert Burns

On Monday 25th January, Scotland celebrated Burns Night. Haggis was cooked, Buckfast was poured and the ephemeral words of Scotland’s most famous poet, Robert Burns, were recited. Each year, on the anniversary of his birth, the self-evident national bard is commemorated over tatties and neeps, paired with the reading of his iconic works. Having been […]

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Culture Literature

Problematising martyrdom of NHS workers

CW: anti-Blackness Gwendolyn Brooks’ marvellous poem Negro Hero is a dramatic monologue for Doris ‘Dorie’ Miller, a Black American sailor honoured ‘for distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on Pearl Harbour – December 7, 1941. The poem is significant as an early entrance of Black […]

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Culture Literature

‘The Brother’s Grimm: living a fairy tale?’

They may have closed their doors for the time being, but the National Library of Scotland have joined the fight to preserve culture in the time of Corona with a series of free online lectures. Over at their website you can find stash of talks on a diverse range of subjects, including feminist history, world […]

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Culture Literature

Poem of the Week: Thomas Hardy’s ‘The Darkling Thrush’

Hardy’s opening stanza includes some of the bleakest lines of poetry I’ve come across, but I equally think that they are the most beautiful and honest. The narrator makes no effort to subdue the desolation and hostility of the scene, and it is in these opening lines that Hardy first depicts the wintry motionlessness of […]

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Culture Literature

Poem of the week: Jack Underwood’s ‘Holy Sonnets X’

 O drunk DEATH, go home. We like our dying lives.             Have a big glass of water and think about it:             I sleep in often. I waste my life like rain. Jack Underwood, Holy Sonnets X, 2015 This 2015 poem takes lead from John Donne, but that is not the most valuable or interesting […]

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Lifestyle

Small Town Syndrome: Finding Liberation in the City

If you were to type ‘small-town syndrome’ into your search bar you’d be likely to come across one of two rather opposing definitions. The first: an inflated sense of self stemming from growing up and having a large reputation in a small town. Or the second: a feeling of restlessness to escape the confines of […]